[Heritage] Oregon Heritage News 2019-04-12 CORRECTION

INFO Heritage * OPRD Heritage.Info at oregon.gov
Fri Apr 12 12:18:06 PDT 2019


Oregon Heritage News 2019-04-12 (video link corrected, apologies)

In this issue:

- 5 Oregon sites listed in the National Register, including the Laurelhurst Historic District
- Heritage Tradition alert! Pear Blossom Festival this weekend in Medford
- Join us for Pre-Summit activities April 24 in Medford
- Deadline approaches for Partners in Preservation 2019
- Applications open for 2019 PNW Preservation Field School
- Fun video showcasing the power of a cemetery cleanup, just in time to register for SOLVE cemetery cleanup day!
- Interpreting "Interpretation"
- One week left to submit Letter of Intent for Preserving Oregon grant
- NAO session on demystifying non-profit finances May 2 in Medford

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5 Oregon sites listed in the National Register, including the Laurelhurst Historic District

Laurelhurst Historic District
Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation (SACHP) recommended the historic district's nomination at their October 2018 meeting. The National Park Service - which maintains the National Register of Historic Places - accepted the nomination on March 18, 2019.

The Laurelhurst Historic District encompasses approximately 392 acres and is generally bounded on the north by NE Multnomah and NE Senate streets; the east by NE 44th Avenue and SE 44th Avenue; on the south by SE Stark Street; and on the west by SE 32nd Avenue and NE 33rd Avenue.

The Laurelhurst Historic District is significant as Portland's only residential subdivision that captures the planning principles of the "City Beautiful" era and is notable for its examples of early 20th century American domestic architecture. The architecture in Laurelhurst includes styles such as Minimal Traditional cottages, WWII-era cottages, and early Ranch designs of the 1930s and 1940s.

The "City Beautiful" era was an American planning movement during the 1890s and 1920s that emerged from the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The movement attempted to design places that visually encouraged civic pride and engagement in the urban landscape through architecture. Advocates hoped that the design of beautiful places could increase the quality of life.

Laurelhurst also represents an example of a cohesive development by Paul C. Murphy, a notable "community builder" who designed, installed infrastructure and amenities, and determined the main stylistic character of a development.

Charles O. and Carie C. Blakely House
Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building's nomination at their October 2018 meeting. The National Park Service-which maintains the National Register-accepted the nomination March 6, 2019.

The Blakely House is locally notable as a distinctive and well-preserved example of Queen Anne architecture in an unusual "butterfly" arrangement, featuring a centered entrance with two symmetrical wings on either side that project toward each street on this corner home. The design is well-suited for corner lots, presenting a "front" to both streets. Decorative Stick style elements include vertical and horizontal trim boards and decorative panels surrounding the windows and doors. The Blakely house was built c. 1893 and is a notable example of the architecture of Portland's growing streetcar suburbs in the 1890s. The property is named for its first residents, Charles O. and Carrie C. Blakely, who raised their family at the house between 1893 and 1909.

Daniel C. and Katie A. McDonald House
Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building's nomination at their October 2018 meeting. The National Park Service-which maintains the National Register-accepted the nomination March 6, 2019.

The Daniel C. and Katie A. McDonald House is a locally-notable example of a builder-designed Queen Anne-style house with unique architectural features. Daniel McDonald was a carpenter and homebuilder in Portland who constructed the home in two phases beginning in 1893. The extensive applied decoration of the Queen Anne style allowed for this eclectic approach to home improvement. The McDonald House exhibits characteristic elements from both the earlier and later periods of the Queen Anne style that reflect the two building phases, approximately ten years apart.

The McDonalds' increased economic status after the turn-of-the-century provided the family the opportunity to expand and update their home after its original construction, including new embellishments and interior spaces that reflected their success.  While it was commonplace for homebuilders to use pattern books for residential construction in middle-class neighborhoods during this time, the McDonald House is not a stock design. Instead, it strongly reflects the adaptability of stock plans, and how the increasing availability of building components and decorative millwork through local building suppliers could be used to create unique homes.

Central Oregon Canal Historic District
Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended forwarding the historic district's nomination to the National Park Service -which maintains the National Register- at their November 2018 meeting. The National Park Service accepted the nomination and listed the Central Oregon Canal Historic District in the National Register on March 18, 2019.

The Central Oregon Canal Historic District represents a portion of the Central Oregon Canal, which, along with the Pilot Butte Canal, forms the backbone of the Central Oregon Project, which provided irrigation to tens of thousands of acres of arid and semi-arid lands, transforming the desert into highly-productive agricultural land. Construction on the Central Oregon Canal began in 1904, reached the now-listed segment in 1905, and was completed to near the Crooked River in late 1911. The Central Oregon Canal Historic District comprises approximately 3.4 miles of the 47-mile long Central Oregon Canal, bounded by Ward Road on the west and Gosney Road on the east.

In addition to its significance to the history of agriculture in Oregon, the Central Oregon Canal Historic District is also historically significant for its demonstration of the extreme and varied efforts required to overcome the challenging volcanic terrain within a short period of time to satisfy contract obligations and successfully deliver irrigation to the lands beyond it, making possible the settlement and development of areas downstream.

Kiernan House
Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building's nomination at their October 2018 meeting. The National Park Service-which maintains the National Register-accepted the nomination March 6, 2019.

The Kiernan House was nominated as a rare survivor of Portland's Pioneer past and is one of only three Italianate single-family houses built before 1870 that remain in Portland. When the house was built on the southwestern edge of Portland, the area was relatively rural and surrounded by the wooded hillsides to the south and west. As the downtown grew, that area became home to many of the city's working class and the homes constructed around the Kiernan House were single and multi-family houses large and small.

The Kiernan House was also nominated for its architectural significance as a representation of Italian Villa architecture. The house is a one-story building with flush tongue-and-groove board siding, segmental-arched windows, and porch and eave details. The earliest image of this house comes from an 1879 map of Portland that shows a similar representation of the current house now.

Located in the Terwilliger Heights neighborhood in southwest Portland, the circa 1865 Kiernan House was moved from downtown Portland to its present location in 1964. The house was in the path of the "new" Stadium Freeway (I-405) construction and so it was slated for demolition.  For $350, James and Ruth Powers purchased the building and found a location to move the building, which is where the building remains. At the time, the location James and Ruth Powers found was a site used by the city to dump dirt while digging a nearby reservoir.

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Heritage Tradition alert! Pear Blossom Festival this weekend in Medford

Pear Blossom Festival Parade, Saturday, April 13, 11am

>From www.pearblossomparade.org<http://www.pearblossomparade.org>:
"Through it's 66 year history associated events have been added, including the Scholarship Pageant, Run and Street Fair. In recent years, the Pear a Fare (local artisan food & beverage tent) and the Smudge Pot Stroll (downtown restaurant event) have been added to make "The Pear Blossom" a true "Festival". We are very excited for 2019 to give even more of our community an opportunity to be involved in Medford's oldest tradition!

The Pear Blossom Parade has grown from 20 wagons and youngsters in the first event to today's 150 entries with 4000 participants and 25-30,000 enthusiasts lining the parade route. The Pear Blossom is a pillar in our community emphasizing family values, commitment and pride in our Rogue Valley. Scholarships for area high school senior girls have been a hallmark of the Festival Association since 1991."

The Oregon Heritage Tradition designation recognizes those events more than 50 years old that represent what it means to be an Oregonian. To see a list of all Oregon Heritage Traditions or to learn more about how to designate an event, visit www.oregonheritage.org<http://www.oregonheritage.org>.

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Join us for Pre-Summit activities April 24 in Medford


Arriving early to the 2019 Oregon Heritage Summit<https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/Pages/Conference.aspx>? Join the fun! Two informal events are planned on Wednesday, April 24.

5-7 p.m. Informal History Walking Tour- Free
Join Ben Truwe of Southern Oregon Historical Society for a walking tour of historic downtown Medford. The tour is approx. a quarter mile long and will include at least one flight of stairs. No registration required. Meet at 106 N Central Ave. by 5 p.m. to participate. Tour ends at Jefferson Spirits where you can purchase a specialty Heritage cocktail!

7 p.m. Keeping Historic Cemeteries Alive! Talk - Free
Join the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries at 4 Daughters, 126 West Main Street, for a presentation that explores events in historic cemeteries that connect people with their local history. Presentation will include a historic portrayal and descriptions of music and events found in cemeteries in Oregon and beyond. Presenters include commissioners Mike Leamy from Astoria, Mark Petire with Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians from North Bend, and Milo Reed with Oregon Black Pioneers from Portland. Joining the commissioners will be Dirk Siedlecki with Friends of Jacksonville Pioneer Cemetery. No registration required.
Still time to register for the 2019 Oregon Heritage Summit: Culture of Board Engagement. Visit here<https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/Pages/Conference.aspx> for more information or to register.

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Deadline approaches for Partners in Preservation 2019

This year, to mark the upcoming 100th Anniversary of the passage of the 19th amendment in 2020, the campaign will have a special emphasis on historic buildings and sites that celebrate the contributions of women in Main Street communities across America, both historic and modern day. Through this, Partners in Preservation will seek to uncover and raise awareness of women's often unrecognized contributions to American history and society.

Have questions, ideas, or want to learn more? Join us for an informational webinar on April 10th, from 1 - 2pm EDT. The webinar will also be available as a recording.

Learn more and apply here<https://www.mainstreet.org/howwecanhelp/pip>.

The open call for nominations ends on Monday, April 22, 2019.

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Applications open for 2019 PNW Preservation Field School

The Pacific Northwest Preservation Field School will hold three one-week sessions at Silver Falls State Park in Oregon this September. The curriculum includes rehabilitating historic windows, logs, shingles, and masonry, as well as lectures on cultural resource management, preservation history, wood science, and more! Visit archenvironment.uoregon.edu/pnwfs to apply!

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Fun video showcasing the power of a cemetery cleanup, just in time to register for SOLVE cemetery cleanup day!

Check out this video diary<https://youtu.be/flfFdyO6nGM> of the road construction to gain access to Gingles Historic Pioneer Cemetery. Opening up this road allows vehicle access so brush and debris can be cleared and removed from the cemetery. Important work in preserving historic resources such as this!

If you want to help cleanup Oregon's historic cemetery, the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries has teamed up with SOLVE for a statewide cemetery cleanup day on May 11.  Visit here<https://www.solveoregon.org/oregon-historic-cemetery-cleanups> to see which cemeteries registered and to sign up for an event near you.

If you help manage an historic cemetery, there is still time to sign your cemetery up for this cleanup day! Visit here<https://www.solveoregon.org/Cemetery-event-leaders?> to register your cemetery.

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Interpreting "Interpretation"

Sheridan Museum of History shares the conversation that happened at their organization about what "interpretation" really mean for a museum and their visitors. Check it out on the Oregon Heritage Exchange Blog<https://oregonheritage.wordpress.com/2019/04/03/interpreting-interpretive/?fbclid=IwAR0q19cf_rhFCV_qxKykC7Ry4qO4EYqa4RhFIwbLZVgJ5hdXuUEIBxOXEOE>.

Sheridan Museum of History used an Oregon Heritage Museum Grant to help improve their exhibits. The deadline for the Museum Grant is May 1, 2019. If you are planning to apply and would like a Mentor to review your grant and provide feedback, contact Katie.Henry at oregon.gov<mailto:Katie.Henry at oregon.gov> or 503-986-0671.

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One week left to submit Letter of Intent for Preserving Oregon grant

Attention National Register listed sites and archaeological sites! The State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) offers matching grants for rehabilitation work that supports the preservation of historic resources listed in the National Register of Historic Places or for significant work contributing toward identifying, preserving and/or interpreting archaeological sites. Currently, $250,000 per biennium is available, and grant funds may be awarded for amounts up to $20,000.

A Letter of Intent is required to apply and is due by April 17. For more information visit https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/FINASST/Pages/grants.aspx#Preserving_Oregon.

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NAO session on demystifying non-profit finances May 2 in Medford

Presenter: Todd Kimball, Partner, CFO Selections

The financial information necessary to successfully operate and navigate a non-profit can be complex and overwhelming. Not only do you need to make sure you are receiving the right information, but Executive Directors and Board members need to know how to interpret it and ask the right questions. Do you have an accurate picture of the organization's health? What should you be looking at, and what types of questions will ensure accountability from your finance and accounting team?

This session will provide an overview of the basic financial statements and how to understand them. We'll dive into the types of information Directors and Boards should be reviewing and things to look for. We will also discuss how to effectively work with your finance and accounting team to achieve greater transparency and improved conversation.

Important note: This session was originally scheduled on February 28. If you were registered for February 28, your registration has automatically been transferred. Please contact training at nonprofitoregon.org<mailto:training at nonprofitoregon.org> if you have questions.

 The location for this session has changed to:

Cascade Christian High School
Common Room
855 Chevy Way
Medford, OR 97504

For more information or to register visit https://nonprofitoregon.org/civicrm/event/register?id=3201&reset=1.

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Share your photos of Oregon's heritage on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using #oregonheritage.

Oregon Heritage News is a service of Oregon Heritage, a division of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. The news editor can be contacted at heritage.info at oregon.gov<mailto:heritage.info at oregon.gov>.


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