In this Issue:

1. Museum Collections Group Shares Information

2. Emigrating to America Exhibit Set to Open

3. Traditional Uses of Columbia Plateau Plants Subject of Talk

4. Rose Farm Museum Set to Open for Summer

 

 

MUSEUM COLLECTIONS GROUP SHARES INFORMATION

 

People who work with museum collections deal with the objects, photos, artwork – basically the “stuff” behind the scenes. Most experience similar issues and have overcome problems with success. A group of such individuals now meets in the Portland area to share their experiences. They exchange information about what works, what doesn’t work, and more. Learn about them and join the discussions taking place at the Oregon Heritage Exchange - http://oregonheritage.wordpress.com and while your there, sign up to receive blog post notification via email.

 

 

EMIGRATING TO AMERICA EXHIBIT SET TO OPEN

 

Between 1889 and 1938, thousands of people passed through a required health inspection at the Knappton Cove Quarantine Center, sometimes called the Columbia River's Ellis Island. A special titled “Emigrating to America” will open at 2 p.m., May 26 at the Knappton Cove Museum in Washington 3 miles upriver (east) on Highway 401 from the north side of the Astoria/Megler Bridge. Vintage photographs illustrate this exhibit, which details the emigrants experience at various ports of departure before boarding ships to America and arriving in ports like Knappton Cove. The exhibit will run through fall 2012. For further information call Nancy Anderson (503) 738-5206 or email thecove@theoregonshore.com .

 

 

TRADITIONAL USES OF COLUMBIA PLATEAU PLANTS SUBJECT OF TALK

 

When hiking through the Columbia River Gorge, have you ever wondered how people used flora and fauna over time for medicinal and food sources? Kimberlee Chambers will present “Plants of the Columbia Plateau: Traditional Uses and Contemporary Applications” at 6:30 p.m., May 29 at McMenamins Edgefield Power Station Theater, 2126 SW Halsey St., Troutdale, as part of the continuing Oregon Encyclopedia History Nights.

 

At this History Night you will have the opportunity to understand how our lives have benefitted from the knowledge of native plants that indigenous peoples have used for thousands of years. In this presentation, Chambers will offer an overview of some of the most important plants of the Columbia Plateau; reviewing their traditional uses and the application of these plants and traditional ecological knowledge to contemporary challenges in land management practices, sustainable foods, natural medicine and climate change.

 

Visit www.oregonencyclopedia.org for History Night locations and more details.

 

 

ROSE FARM MUSEUM SET TO OPEN FOR SUMMER

 

The Rose Farm Museum will open for tours on Saturday afternoons from noon – 4 p.m., beginning June 2 through Sept. 1.  Visitors will see the Holmes House, one of the earliest American homes in Oregon built by William and Louisa Holmes in 1847, which served as a social center for Oregon City well into the 1900s.  General Joseph Lane, the first territorial governor, gave his inaugural address from the balcony in 1849. 

 

Operated by the McLoughlin Memorial Association tours take approximately 45 minutes, and can accommodate groups of up to 20 people.  For reservations and additional information, call (503) 656-5146 or visit www.mcloughlinhouse.org .



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