In this Issue:

1. Preservation Month Fair set at State Capitol

2. Neighborhoods, tribal lands – community preservation on Exchange

3. “The How, Where and Why of Traditional Cultural Properties”

4. Emergency, disaster preparedness webinars offered May 28 and 29

5. Shelton McMurphy House offers summer internships

 

 

PRESERVATION MONTH FAIR SET AT STATE CAPITOL

 

Heritage Programs will host the fifth annual Preservation Month Fair at State Capitol State Park from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. on May 30 in Salem. Community organizations from around the area and several state agencies will provide information about their efforts to help preserve Oregon’s history. The event will take place on the north side of Court Street opposite the Capitol building. The Oregon State Capitol will offer 30-minute tours of the building at noon and 12:30 p.m., including a 121 step climb to see the “Oregon Pioneer,” which stands atop the building, and a spectacular view of the city and the surrounding area. Those interested in participating in the Capitol building tour should meet 10 minutes early at the information kiosk on the first floor in the Capitol.

 

 

NEIGHBORHOODS, TRIBAL LANDS – COMMUNITY PRESERVATION ON EXCHANGE

 

Recently, a group of volunteers committed to community preservation halted the destruction of three vintage houses in Portland’s Buckman neighborhood. Cathy Galbraith, Executive Director of the Architectural Heritage Center, shares their story and the results of their efforts in Early Lessons from a Neighborhood Historic District. Shalaya Williams, an oral history technical trainee with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, describes finding a balance between tradition laws and adapting to change while protecting tribal lands in her story, Continuous Evolution. Read both stories and others related to community preservation efforts across the state on Heritage Exchange.

 

 

“THE HOW, WHERE AND WHY OF TRADITIONAL CULTURAL PROPERTIES”

 

Portland State University has produced a video recording of "The How, Where, and Why of Traditional Cultural Properties*," a symposium chaired and moderated by National Park Service Archaeologist and NCRI Director Dr. Doug Wilson. The panel included representatives from tribes, private sector consultants, academia, and other federal agencies. The symposium video is available for viewing at http://youtu.be/T-ZwhvXUL6U.  Learn more about the NCRI by visiting

http://www.nps.gov/fova/historyculture/ncri.htm.

 

 

EMERGENCY, DISASTER PREPAREDNESS WEBINARS OFFERED MAY 28 AND 29

 

Balboa Art Conservation Center will offer webinars on May 28 and 29, which cover issues for emergency and disaster preparedness. The 20 individuals to register can participate free.

 

“Introduction to Emergency Preparedness” will take place from 10 – 11:30 a.m., May 28. This webinar introduces practical measures to consider when developing an institution’s emergency plan for collections, including how to prepare for an emergency and the components of a comprehensive response and recovery plan.

 

“Risk Management for Disaster Preparedness” will run from 10 – 11:30 a.m., May 29. This webinar will guide participants through the process of identifying, mitigating, and controlling their institution’s risks and hazards.

 

Kara West, Assistant Director for Field Services, will present both webinars. For further information, visit http://www.bacc.org/ed_wkshop.htm. Register either webinar by emailing your name, organization affiliation, and contact details to bhawketts@bacc.org.

 

 

SHELTON MCMURPHY HOUSE OFFERS SUMMER INTERNSHIPS

 

The Shelton McMurphy House is offering summer internships to students of historic preservation, history, museum studies, and related material culture and historical interpretation fields in the areas of exhibits, oral history and curation. Successful applicants will have research, computer, technology, and writing skills as well as enthusiasm about making history accessible to the public. Visit http://www.smjhouse.org/w/internships for further information about available internships and the application process.

 

 

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Are you looking for tips or resources on heritage tourism? Do you need information on planning, organizing, and successful completion of heritage and preservation-related projects? For help on these and other topics, visit Oregon Heritage’s Technical Assistance page.

 

Oregon Heritage, part of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, provides technical support and services to people and organizations documenting, preserving, interpreting and sharing Oregon's heritage. Keep up with the latest heritage issues and trends at Oregon Heritage Exchange and follow us on Facebook.

 

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