In this issue:

1. State advisory committee meets Feb. 19 in Gresham

2. UO field school to focus on old cultural site

3. Education, program positions open at two places

4.  Norris to speak about Willamette Falls state heritage area

5.  Grants support collections preservation needs assessments

 

 

STATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETS FEB. 19 IN GRESHAM

 

Oregon’s State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation will consider nominations to the National Register of Historic Places in a one-day meeting on Feb. 19 at the City of Gresham Conference Center, 1333 NW Eastman Parkway. The meeting begins at 1:30 p.m. and is open to the public.

 

The committee will review proposed nominations for the Vale IOOF Hall in Vale; Fairview City Jail in Fairview; the Hamlin-Johnson House in Gresham; the W. Leland James House in Portland; and Antelope School in Antelope. The agenda and electronic copies of all meeting documents are available online .

 

Nominations recommended by the committee go to the National Park Service, which maintains the Register under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. Members of the Committee hold credentials in many historic preservation-related fields.

 

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the hearing impaired may be made by calling (503) 986-0655. More information about the National Register and Oregon properties listed in the Register is online.

 

 

UO FIELD SCHOOL TO FOCUS ON OLD CULTURAL SITE

 

The University of Oregon’s Archaeology Field School will focus on its Northern Great Basin Prehistory Project this summer. Working with archaeologist Dennis Jenkins, people can learn field techniques, earn UO credit, and expand career horizons at one of Oregon's oldest cultural sites, the Connley Caves. Composed of eight caves and rockshelters located in the Fort Rock basin, the Connley Caves site has produced evidence of human occupation dating back 13,000 years.

 

The 2016 field school runs from June 20-July 29. Registration is now open. Learn more at http://greatbasinfieldschool.uoregon.edu/

 

 

EDUCATION, PROGRAM POSITIONS OPEN AT TWO PLACES

 

The Friends of the Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge are recruiting for a new position of cultural education specialist at the Cathlapotle Plankhouse on the Ridgefield NWR in Ridgefield, Wash. The full scale Chinookan-style plankhouse interprets the village of Cathlapotle, a Native village site on the Lower Columbia River. The full job announcement and position description can be found on the Friends of Ridgefield NWR website at http://ridgefieldfriends.org/?page_id=87 The application deadline is Feb. 25.

 

Know Your City is seeking a part-time programs coordinator to assist in the development of the spring and summer programs schedule. This person will work with staff and volunteers on the programs committee to assist in research, volunteer recruitment, and coordination of programs on history, civics, and social justice in Portland. The ideal candidate will have demonstrable experience with the event planning, civic engagement, and the arts. For more information, visit  http://knowyourcity.org/were-hiring/  The application deadline is Feb. 19.

 

 

NORRIS TO SPEAK ABOUT WILLAMETTE FALLS STATE HERITAGE AREA

 

Former Oregon City mayor Alice Norris will speak at 7 p.m. Feb. 18 about the Willamette Falls State Heritage Area and its efforts to strengthen and expand toward a national heritage area. Her talk will take place at the Tualatin Heritage Center, 8700 SW Sweek Drive, Tualatin.

 

The event is sponsored by the Tualatin Historical Society and the lower Columbia chapter of the Ice Age Floods Institute.

For more information call Yvonne Addington at 503.625.2704.

 

 

GRANTS SUPPORT COLLECTIONS PRESERVATION NEEDS ASSESSMENTS

 

The Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts is seeking applicants for its Preservation Needs Assessment Program. With funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, CCAHA  offers a limited number of subsidized preservation needs assessments. Awarded institutions will pay $350 for services valued at over $5,000.
 

A preservation needs assessment is a key first step in the process of caring for collections. In addition to pinpointing areas of concern, the preservation needs assessment is widely recognized as a valuable tool in fundraising. Many funders strongly recommend that potential applicants cite the findings of these assessments within their grant applications for conservation and preservation projects.

 

The preservation needs assessment process encompasses a general evaluation of the institution's preservation needs for its collections, including preservation planning and policy development; collections management; environment (temperature, relative humidity, pollution, and light); housekeeping; pest control; fire protection, security, and disaster preparedness; and collection storage, handling, exhibition, and treatment.

 

For more information, visit the CCAHA website.

 

 

Share your photos of Oregon’s heritage on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using #oregonheritage.

 

Oregon Heritage News is a service of Oregon Heritage, a division of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. The news editor can be contacted at heritage.info@oregon.gov